16th/17th Century Tudor Dress Pins & Bodkins
Text Box: 16th/17th Century Tudor Dress Pins & Bodkins

 Home
Text Box:  Home
Awaiting photo
Text Box: Awaiting photo

This silver bodkin was found at the site of a glassworks in the parish of Newent that was operated by Huguenots      c1595 to c1630. It has the letters I A scratched on it's surface.

Text Box: This silver bodkin was found at the site of a glassworks in the parish of Newent that was operated by Huguenots      c1595 to c1630. It has the letters I A scratched on it's surface.

The above gold & silver Dress Pin was found  by Don Sherratt in a field on the outskirts of Newent, Glos in 2006. The loop would have been for the attachment of a chain to help prevent loss.

It is classed as treasure under the Treasure Act and has been reported to the coroner.

 

Text Box: The above gold & silver Dress Pin was found  by Don Sherratt in a field on the outskirts of Newent, Glos in 2006. The loop would have been for the attachment of a chain to help prevent loss.
It is classed as treasure under the Treasure Act and has been reported to the coroner.
 

During the Tudor period hair decorations were very fashionable with wealthy ladies. These ornate gold and silver pins were often worn in the hair with the spherical decorated knob protruding over the centre of the forehead.

 

Several have been found by detectorists during recent years and many are found with the pin deliberately bent. The reason no doubt was to help prevent them slipping out of the hair.

 

Apart from their domestic use silver bodkins were also used in the hair in a similar fashion.

 

Sometimes a drop pearl was suspended over the forehead by a piece of silver wire from the hole in the blunt end. As an indication of the value to the owner many are found with initials scratched onto the surface.

 

The Pedlars Song in the 'Triumphant Widow' (1677) sums up the bodkin use.

 

Silver bodkins for your hair,                                  Bobs that maidens love to wear.

Text Box: During the Tudor period hair decorations were very fashionable with wealthy ladies. These ornate gold and silver pins were often worn in the hair with the spherical decorated knob protruding over the centre of the forehead.
 
Several have been found by detectorists during recent years and many are found with the pin deliberately bent. The reason no doubt was to help prevent them slipping out of the hair.
 
Apart from their domestic use silver bodkins were also used in the hair in a similar fashion. 
 
Sometimes a drop pearl was suspended over the forehead by a piece of silver wire from the hole in the blunt end. As an indication of the value to the owner many are found with initials scratched onto the surface.
 
The Pedlars Song in the 'Triumphant Widow' (1677) sums up the bodkin use.
 
Silver bodkins for your hair,                                  Bobs that maidens love to wear.
 
Text Box:  
Text Box: