The Glider Pilot Regiment 1942-1945

 

 

The Regiment   

Gliders  

Operations

Association

                     Contact Association

               Links 

                                         Books

 

Tugs

Armstrong Whitworth Albemarle

 Armstrong Whitworth Whitley

       Douglas Dakota

                                                                Handley Page Halifax

 

Short Stirling

 


Royal Air Force Transport Command provided the tug aircraft for the gliders.



Armstrong Whitworth Albemarle

 

The Albemarle was designed as a light bomber built from non-strategic materials. It was built from wood and steel instead of aluminium alloys, and suitable for construction in dispersed factories. It was a clean aircraft with a tricycle undercarriage. Performance was mediocre, and it was used mainly as a glider tug and transport.

Return to top of page

Armstrong Whitworth Whitley

Twin-engined monoplane bomber. The Whitley was one of the first heavy night bombers of the RAF, and the first RAF aircraft with a stressed-skin fuselage. It had a characteristic nose-down flying attitude, because of the high incidence of the wing. Performance was mediocre, and from 1942 onwards it was used as a trainer and glider tug.

Return to top of page

Douglas Dakota

The C-47, probably the most recognised of all WWII transport aircraft was adapted from the DC-3 Dakota commercial airliner and was used to carry personnel and cargo, tow gliders and drop paratroopers.

Return to top of page

Handley Page Halifax V

 

Heavy bomber, less known than the Lancaster but almost as important. It was built both with Rolls-Royce Merlin liquid-cooled and Bristol Hercules radial engines. The Halifax was a mid-wing aircraft with twin fins and rudders and a fuselage of rectangular cross-section. Halifaxes flew 75532 missions during WWII. They were also used as glider tugs and transport. A nickname was "Halibag".

Return to top of page

Short Stirling

First of the RAF's four-engined heavy bombers. Soon replaced by the Lancaster and Halifax, and used as target tug. The shortcomings of the Stirling were mostly due to faulty specifications. The Stirling had too small a wing, and its towering high undercarriage was necessary to give the small wing a sufficient incidence for take-off and landing. The Stirling Mk.V was a transport version for 40 paratroopers or big load.

Return to top of page

 All photographs courtesy of Museum of Army Flying


HOME