Bells of Liverpool
..
Samuel M Austin



Liverpool, St Luke
Formerly 8 bells, 16-2-16

Grid Ref.:
Lancashire Association
Frame: By George Gillibrand 1828. Believed to be the first cast iron bell frame ever made. The frame is still in position.
Retuning:
Ringing room: Upstairs
Sound:
Go:

Bell

Weight

Diameter

Note

Founder

 

 

The top figure is that from Taylor’s inspection book and the lower is diameters from F. H. Cheetham

 

 

Treble

5-1-15

28Ό”

29”

E

William Dobson, Downham 1818

2

5-2-23

29½”

30”

D#

William Dobson, Downham 1818

3

5-2-27

30½”

32”

C#

William Dobson, Downham 1818

4

6-0-22

32”

33”

B

William Dobson, Downham 1818

5

6-3-19

33Ύ”

34”

A

William Dobson, Downham 1818

6

9-1-8

37”

37”

G#

William Dobson, Downham 1818

7

11-0-6

39Ύ”

40”

F#

William Dobson, Downham 1818

8

16-2-16

45”

46”

E

William Dobson, Downham 1818

Inscriptions

Treble:     PEACE AND GOOD NEIGHBOURHOOD

2              THE LORD TO PRAISE MY VOICE ILL RAISE

3              WILLIAM DOBSON FECIT 1818

4              O GIVE THANKS TO THE LORD FOR HE IS GRACIOUS

5              FEAR GOD HONOUR THE KING

6              WILLIAM DOBSON DOWNHAM NORFOLK FOUNDER 1818

7              THESE EIGHT BELLS WERE CAST BY WILLIAM DOBSON ANNO DOMINI 1818

Tenor       I TO THE CHURCH THE LIVING CALL AND TO THE GRAVE DO SUMMON
                ALL. W. DOBSON FECIT 1818


Historical Events & Dates

• 1811-1831: Church was built
• 1818: The bells were cast intended for Newton Heath but never hung, as it was doubted whether the tower was capable of standing the strain.
• 1824: The bells were still unhung and kept in a warehouse in Manchester.
• 1828: The bells were bought by the Liverpool Corporation and hung in the earliest cast iron bell frame at St. Luke’s.
• 1829: Bells first rung on April 23rd and the first peal being rung on July 6th.
• 1931: Last peal on the bells.
• 1940: Church destroyed by enemy bombing.
• 1941: Three broken bells with other metal totalling 55½cwt was kept at Loughborough until the 1950s.
• 2005: The church stands empty and roofless as a memorial to the nearly four-thousand Merseyside civilians who lost their lives in the Blitz. In the future is hoped that the tower will become a training centre with the possibility of the ex Widnes bells being installed in the original Gillibrand frame.

A more comprehensive history of St. Luke’s bells is available. Peace and Good Neighbourhood by Bryan J. McCahey the story of St. Luke’s bells.

More details on the Merseyside Bell Restoration Group Web site
http://www.angelfire.com/co2/bellsmerseyside/bell.html
 

Sources

F. H. Cheetham – Church bells of Lancashire
Taylor inspection book 11/07/1922 and file. – Chris Pickford
David Lewis – The churches of Liverpool.

www.bellsofliverpool.co.uk