BIOGRAPHY
  
FILM PAGE ONE
  
FILM PAGE TWO
  
FILM PAGE THREE
  
PUBLICITY PHOTOS
Charlotte Henry and Charles Farrell
FORBIDDEN HEAVEN
Charlotte Henry is known only as "The Girl" in this 1935 production. She co-stars with Charles Farrell who plays a British working man called Niba, who hopes one day to attain a Parliamentary seat. Niba's life is permanently altered when he rescues a forlorn American girl Ann (Charlotte Henry).

Charlotte Henry in Forbidden Heaven

The Return of Jimmy Valentine (1936) .... Midge Davis
... aka Jimmy Valentine (1936) (UK)
... aka Prison Shadows (1936/II) (USA: new title)
SYNOPSIS: Impressed by the popularity of radio program about the exploits of legendary safecracker Jimmy Valentine, advertising man Gary Howard (Roger Pryor) posts a huge reward for anyone who knows the whereabouts of real Valentine, who is technically still a fugitive from justice. Following a lead, Howard ends up in a small town, where it appears as though Valentine has been living a respectable pseudonymous life as the town banker (played by Robert Warwick, coincidentally the star of the 1915 film Alias Jimmy Valentine!) Just as Howard is about to "expose" the banker, another old duffer steps forth to claim that he's Valentine. By now, Howard has fallen in love with banker's daughter Midge (Charlotte Henry), so he decides to let sleeping crooks lie.

Hearts in Bondage (1936) .... Julie
THE PLOT : Torn between love and loyalty, Naval officers Lieutenant Kenneth Reynolds (James Dunn), his friend Raymond Jordan (David Manners) and two senior Naval officers, Commander Jordan (Henry B. Walthall) and Captain Buchanan (Fritz Leiber) are faced with difficult decisions when the civil war breaks out. Reynolds is in love with Jordanís sister Constance (Mae Clarke), while Jordan adores Julie (Charlotte Henry), the daughter of Captain Buchanan. During the fierce naval battle on the East Coast, old friends Kenneth and Raymond find themselves on opposite sides, as do Captains Buchanan and Jordan. Despite Constanceís pleas, Kenneth enlists and is soon in the heat of a bitter sea-battle, in which Raymond is killed. Constance is heartbroken at the news of her brotherís death, and it takes the intervention of none other than President Abe Lincoln himself to set things right between her and Kenneth.

Gentleman from Louisiana (1936) .... Linda Costigan

The Mandarin Mystery (1936) .... Josephine Temple
SYNOPSIS: The story, based on the Ellery Queen novel The Chinese Orange Mystery, is set in motion by a crook who steals a $50,000 stamp, which results in two murders -- both committed in impenetrably locked rooms. The primary suspect is Jo Temple (Charlotte Henry), the original possessor of the stamp. Falling in love with Jo, Ellery sets about to retrieve the stolen goods and solve the murders.

Charlotte Henry in Charlie Chan Charlie Chan at the Opera (1937) .... Kitty Rochelle
SYNOPSIS: Regarded by many as the best of the Charlie Chan series. The opera star Gravelle suffers amnesia. He is a recent escapee from an insane asylum, accused of murdering fellow performers (his wife and her lover). Included in the movie is the opera "Carnival", composed for the picture by Oscar Levant. "Warner Oland vs. Boris Karloff" read the billing on the opening credits of Charlie Chan at the Opera. Karloff plays a once-famous opera star who has long been confined to an insane asylum. He escapes, ostensibly to seek revenge on the diva wife (Nedda Harrigan) who'd betrayed him years earlier. Karloff shows up during the performance of a new opera, and within minutes the murders start. Detective William Demarest figures the case is open and shut, but oriental sleuth Charlie Chan (Oland) is not thoroughly convinced of Karloff's guilt--nor is he certain that Boris is genuinely insane. To give away the ending would be churlish, but we can note that Charlotte Henry plays Karloff's daughter, who has been raised to believe that her father was dead. Considered by some Charlie Chan fans to be the best of the Warner Oland efforts, Charlie Chan at the Opera is distinguished by excellent production values, and by an original opera composed by Oscar Levant--who allegedly agreed to this assignment provided he could include the word "Silencio!" in his lyrics.

God's Country and the Man (1937) .... Betty Briggs
SYNOPSIS: After Red kills Jim Reed's father, he takes his girlfriend Roxey's money and heads north. Looking for his father's killer, Jim accidently meets up with Roxey. When they discover gold, she uses the money to open a dancehall. She figures Red will hear about it and when he appears she will get her revenge when Jim gets the man he is after. The first of four Tom Keene westerns for Monogram release, God's Country and the Man is fine, virile stuff in the old William S. Hart tradition. Keene is cast as wandering cavalier Jim, who finds himself in the Tall Timber territory of Canada. Here he runs afoul of scurrilous gunslinger Gentry (Charles King), the scourge of the Mounties. Not only does Jim neutralize Gentry, but he also helps a poor blacksmith (Billy Bletcher) stake a valuable gold claim. For his initial Monogram outing, Keene is favored with two leading ladies: Charlotte Henry, the onetime star of Alice in Wonderland, and silent-screen favorite Betty Compson, here given an opportunity to display her skill with the violin.
... aka Avenging Stranger, The (1937) (UK)

Young Dynamite (1937) .... Jane Shields
SYNOPSIS: A young, newly-appointed rookie state trooper, John Shields (legendary stuntman David Sharpe), is celebrating with his sister Jane (Charlotte Henry), his younger brother Freddie (Frankie Darro) and Tom Marlin (Kane Richmond), Jane's fiance and also a trooper, when they hear over the radio that two bandits have just killed a lawyer and his watchman. John and Tom set out in their patrol cars in hopes of capturing the killers, followed by Freddie who hopes some day to qualify as a trooper. Freddie encounters the two two bandits, Spike Doland (Carleton Young) and Butch (Pat Gleason) and manages to get away with the bag of gold they had stolen. While chasing Freddie they are recognized by John who they kill when he tries to arrest them. Freddie then takes matters into his own hands in seeking to capture the killers of his brother. His sister's fiancť helps him find the gangsters who did the killing. They find them and then trick the crooks into entering a boarding house where they claim gold is hidden. There the heroes discover that the crime boss is a crippled boarder who lives there. Just when it looks like curtains for the heroes, the cops arrive and bring the crooks to justice.

Jungle Terror (1937) .... Dorothy Elliott
SYNOPSIS: Carefully measuring the success of Republic's Clyde Beatty serial Darkest Africa, Columbia top-billed wild animal hunter Frank "Bring 'Em Back Alive" Buck in the 15-chapter Jungle Menace. The story takes place in the mythical Asian province of Seemang, where rubber planter Edward Elliot (John St. Polis) owns a huge and profitable plantation. When river pirates hijack one of Elliotís shipments, his daughter Dorothy (Charlotte Henry) and her planter friend Tom Banning (William Bakewell) narrowly escape with their lives. Things get worse when Elliot himself is shot by an unknown assailant, at which point soldier-of-fortune Frank Hardy (Buck) takes a hand in matters. For the rest of the serial, Hardy tries to ascertain the identity of the mysterious villain who wishes to drive Elliot off his property, while poor Dorothy is subjected to one jungle peril after another.

Bowery Blitzkrieg (1941) .... Mary Breslin
... aka Stand and Deliver (1941) (UK)
SYNOPSIS: The East Side Kids discover that one of their own, Danny, is torn between staying in school and becoming a boxer, and is getting mixed up with gangsters. Former "Dead End Kid" Huntz Hall made his first appearance with the "East Side Kids" in 1941's Bowery Blitzkrieg. The plotline concentrates on Danny Breslin (Bobby Jordan), a good kid in danger of going bad thanks to the influence of two-bit crook Monk Martin (Bobby Stone). When Danny is disqualified from the upcoming Golden Gloves boxing championship, his pal Mugs (Leo Gorcey) takes his place. Thanks to the chicanery of Monk and his gambling cronies, the public becomes convinced that Mugs intends to throw the fight. Nothing could be further from the truth.

Charlotte Henry portrait circa 1940 Flying Blind (1941) .... Corenson's Secretary
SYNOPSIS: A spy steals a secret military device, then hijacks an airliner to get away. The airliner crashes in the wilderness & the survivors are threatened by a raging forest fire.

She's in the Army (1942) .... Helen
SYNOPSIS: She's in the Army is a fascinating vehicle for character actress Lucille Gleason (aka Mrs. James Gleason), heretofore usually confined to supporting roles. Gleason is cast as Hannah, a crusty, all-knowing sergeant in the Women's Ambulance and Defense Corps. Brassy nightclub singer Diane (Veda Ann Borg) would rather romance Army captain Steve (Lyle Talbot) than follow Hannah's orders, but eventually she realizes that her first duty is to her country. Likewise, dizzy Marie Wilson "smarts up" enough to prove her value to the Corps.

I Live on Danger (1942) .... Nurse
SYNOPSIS: A fast-moving thriller with strong performances and top-notch direction -- by former screenwriter Sam White -- which overcomes some weaknesses in the plot. Jeff Morrell (Chester Morris) is a newscaster who gets involved in saving wrongly accused Eddie Nelson (Edward Norris) from a murder charge. Nelson's sister, Susan Richards (Jean Parker) is fundamental in keeping interest in the case, as she becomes his romantic interest. Both Chester Morris and Jean Parker are fine as the romantic pair, who fights to save the innocent man.

BIOGRAPHY
  
FILM PAGE ONE
  
FILM PAGE TWO
  
FILM PAGE THREE
  
PUBLICITY PHOTOS