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THE BATMAN
After the massive success of the first "BATMAN" movie, Tim Burton agreed to direct the follow-up - "BATMAN RETURNS". The first film had taken some liberties with Bob Kane's original concepts. One wonders, for example, why the important relationship between Batman and Commisioner Gordon was dumped in favour of the semi-comical portrayal by a miscast Pat Hingle. This seems to be a kind of fetish for Hollywood producers - look closely at a subject, find out exactly what makes it work and why it's so successful , then throw these elements out of the window! However, I digress.
The second movie, whilst not exactly a follow-on, retained the excellent dark imagery and basic character threads from the first film and, while it almost sinks under another strange Hollywood fetish for stuffing far too many villains into the one pot, it's none-the-less a strong outing for the Batman series. Something which particularly interested Tim Burton was the schizophrenic aspects of not only the central character but also those of Batman's adversaries - The Penguin and Catwoman.

Michelle Pfeiffer emerges as Catwoman's ultimate incarnation. As conceived and written, Catwoman is a deeply complex character, incorporating in one disjointed soul the oppressed and the avenger, the desperately needy and the ferociously independent.
What did Michelle Pfeiffer find so appealing and fascinating about Catwoman when she was first introduced to the character? "I guess she just broke all of the stereotypes of what it meant to be a woman," she recalls.
"I found that shocking and titillating and forbidden. Also, I was probably at the age where I was really coming into my own sexuality, and I just found Catwoman thrilling to watch."

Michelle Pfeiffer was also thrilling to watch as she created the twin roles of Catwoman and Selina Kyle, throwing herself into the maelstrom of an extremely demanding part.
Pfeiffer not only had to tack down the dramatically different traits of Catwoman and Selina in a pure acting sense, she also had to become an expert in both martial arts and the whip to carry out the extraordinarily difficult action sequences, training for several hours a day months before filming started.
 
Pfeiffer notes: "It's ironic that Catwoman might be the most difficult role I've ever played. We're trying to do something more than a two-dimensional comic-book character, and I approach it as seriously as I would any role.
"The character of Catwoman and Selina Kyle deals with duality, and I think that people in general - and women in particular have a hard time accepting both their light and dark sides. I just find Catwoman to be an amazingly powerful, moving, funny and very touching character. I've loved playing her."

And one final question. Is Michelle Pfeiffer more attracted to Catwoman or Selina Kyle? "When I'm doing Catwoman and flying with that, I'm really loving Catwoman," she responds. "And when I'm kind of goofy and falling apart as Selina, I'm having a really great time with her.
For her role of Catwoman, Michelle worked several hours each week, first with kickboxer Kathy Long on her fighting technique, then with Anthony De Longis on her whip skills. "Michelle is using the whip exactly as Catwoman would. It's sensual, sinuous, sexual and dangerous. Michelle and the whip really complement each other, she's an actress with a tremendous amount of emotional impact. She's utilizing that whip as a dynamic point of connection... she takes her energy and channels it into the whip"

Max Kleven and Dave Lea, Michael Keaton's trainers said, "Michael and Michelle are both doing their own stuff on that rooftop, and it's pretty unusual for two stars to do so much physical work.

The rooftop fight was the first major battle between Batman and Catwoman, so we really had to make it dramatic and strong."
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THE BATMAN