World Heritage Status agreement with UNESCO violated - The infilling and proposed in-filling of historic docks violates the World Heritage Status agreement with UNESCO.

UNESCO protected dock marine life killed - The essential and unique marine life has been killed at West Waterloo and Princes Half-Tide Docks.

Liverpool's Heritage and History being destroyed -
Historic docks are slowly being obliterated.


Liverpool's future dissolving - The foundation of The City On The Water we were promised, living around the water spaces, is being destroyed.

Fast Buck Merchants Prey on City - These proposals are merely to make big fast money for the developer.

City Violates World Hertitage Status Agreement

World Heritage Site Violations

Below: Princes Half-Tide Dock has been in-filled resulting in all the UNESCO protected unique marine life now being firmly dead.


The City of Liverpool is violating its agreement to gain and maintain World Heritage Status.  Dock in-filling planning proposals and activities at Central Docks clearly violate the status.  The killing of the protected marine life is in clear violation of the UNESCO agreement.

A planning application was submitted to fill in West Waterloo Dock. The World Heritage Site Plan has West Waterloo Dock within the buffer zone. Described as follows. UNESCO agreement in blue:

2.1.13  "The Buffer Zone has been developed to ensure that future development in the setting of the nominated site respects the values of the nominated site. The boundaries of the buffer zone have been confirmed through a process of stakeholder consultation, during the ongoing production of this World Heritage Site Management Plan."

2.5 PROTECTIVE MEASURES AND MEANS OF IMPLEMENTING THEM

2.5.1   "The significance of the site's built heritage, including its proposed buffer zone, is safeguarded through a Range of protective measures provided under established planning legislation, policies and practice. Planning issues in respect of new buildings, changes of use of existing buildings and land and alterations to and management of existing buildings in England are controlled by the English system of land-use planning. The current principal statues are the Planning Act 1990 and the Planning (listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) Act 1990,"

The following, 2.5.9, states that proposals must:

"protect, conserve and, where appropriate, enhance the built heritage of the region."

This means new buildings in line with the architectural theme of  Waterloo and Stanley Dock warehouses, and conservation is clearly not in-filling docks.  Neither is it using the infilled Trafalgar Dock as a waste dump. Conservation would mean excavating this dock along with Victoria Dock. The dock still exists with the granite quays still intact.

2.5.9   policy ER3 - Built Heritage states that: "Planning authorities and other agencies in their plans, policies and proposals will identify, protect, conserve and, where appropriate, enhance the built heritage of the region"

2.5.12  "Liverpool City Council is required by the Local Government Act 1985 to prepare a Development Plan for the whole of its area to guide development and to protect and enhance the environment of the City. The Plan comprises a comprehensive written statement, supported by a map, which spells out the Council's proposals for land-use and development in the future. Following extensive public consultation, a modified Deposit draft of the Liverpool Unitary Development plan (UDP) was produced in November 200. The UDP has now been formally adopted and is the Development Plan for the nominated World Heritage Site."

2.5.23  "In accordance with Paragraph 17 of the Operational Guidelines for the Implementation of the World Heritage Convention UNESCO 1999, A Buffer Zone has been developed to help to ensure that future development in the setting of the Nominated Site. The boundaries of the proposed Buffer Zone will be confirmed through a process of stakeholder consultation, during the ongoing production of the World Heritage Site Management Plan."

The World Heritage Plan clearly states the importance of keeping the current dock system within the World Heritage and buffer sites. The following statement clearly states that the docks must remain:

4.6.16  Many of the former docks survive to the form of now redundant water bodies. These are an important aspect of the Site's significance and character and their conservation and use requires consideration within future sustainable regeneration schemes. Currently, many water bodies are used for limited recreational/leisure purposes and this is likely to provide a long-term and sustainable use for them. The ownership and primary management long-term and sustainable use for them. The ownership and primary management responsibilities for most of the water bodies south of the pier head were transferred from English Partnerships to British Waterways in mid-2003. British Waterways are now developing a management regime for their water bodies. It is essential that this regime is developed in consultation with all relevant stakeholders to ensure that the docks are properly preserved and enhanced and the potential that is embodied within them is maximised. Most of the water bodies north of the Pier Head are owned by MDHC, and proposals for developing most of them for leisure are being developed."

This statement from the above clearly forbids the in-filling of docks:

"Many of the former docks survive to the form of now redundant water bodies. These are an important aspect of the Site's significance and character and their conservation and use requires consideration within future sustainable regeneration schemes."

4.8.4   Appropriateness of new development " Key to conserving the significance of the site is ensuring that all new developments are appropriate in terms of their location and design"

4.10.5  Alterations or enhancement of existing developments "In general terms, any alterations to existing structures within Liverpool's historic centre pose a potential threat to the city's archaeological resource. The most obvious threat to the archaeological resource comes from ground works associated with alterations or refurbishment, such as building extensions, underpinning, and internal works such as the .....This applies not only to buildings but also to other facilities, in particular the surviving historic docks, where developments have the potential to impact upon the buried remains of earlier docks, demolished dockyard buildings and deposits pre-dating the establishment of the dock system."

4.15.4  Recognition of the boundary "If the outstanding universal value of the WHS are to be appropriately protected and enhanced then the boundary must be recognised by all agencies involved in the Site's management."


Destruction of Marine Life

The docks have a marine ecosystem and without it the docks would fill with algae and stink. Deep in the docks living creatures filter the water by eating. The docks are home to jellyfish, mussels, sponges and seaweed. Some of the marine inhabitants of the docks come from other countries, transported  in the ballast tanks of ships. Giant snails and Korean sea squirts can be found, being originally brought over in the 1950’s and now dominate many dock walls. There are barnacles in the docks that have come from as far away as New Zealand and Australia.

The reduction of the depth of Princes Half Tide Dock from deep water to little more than pond depth, had a negative impact on the marine environment. No consideration was given to the essential marine life, all of which are now dead.

As detailed in the World Heritage Site Plan which the City Council, MDHC and UNESCO are cosignatories, clearly states that:

4.17.4   Docks with standing water in the site and Buffer Zone support a range of marine life and habitats. Of particular note are the colonies of marine life attached to the dock walls and other structures. In the Mersey itself, these colonies tend not to have become established as the high silt load of the river suffocates the organisms. The docks are therefore an important habitat."

The above clearly states that the docks and wildlife habits have to stay. By killing the marine life, the World Heritage Status agreement has been violated.

Below: West Waterloo Dock filled with algae as the unique marine life was killed.

Photo courtesy of Dave Wood at Liverpool Pictorial


UNESCO Agreement



Complain to Liverpool's UNESCO Rep

The local man to complain regarding World Heritage Status:

John Hinchliffe,
World Heritage Officer,
Liverpool City Council,
Millennium House,
60 Victoria Street,
Liverpool
L1 6JF
Tel: 0151 233 5367
Email: john.hinchliffe@liverpool.gov.uk



Complain to UNESCO Direct

Dr Mechtild Rossler,
World Heritage Centre,
UNESCO,
7, Place de Fontenoy,
75352 Paris 07 SP
France

Fax: 33 (01) 45 68 55 70

E-mail: wh-info@unesco.org